Category: Gear Reviews & Comparisons

Canon T6 vs T7

Canon T6 vs. Canon T7: The Complete Comparison

Canon T6 vs. Canon T7: The Complete Comparison

In this post, we break down the differences between two of Canon’s most popular entry-level cameras, so you can decide which is the best model for you.

The Canon T6 and the Canon T7 are both camera models from Canon’s entry-level line of DSLR cameras. Both are targeted towards beginners and enthusiasts who are ready to step into DSLR photography.

The Canon T7 was released two years after the Canon T6 making it the newer model, but each of these cameras has its own set of features to compare. Price is the biggest difference between the two models, but there are other reasons you may choose one over the other.

At a glance, these cameras look extremely similar. That’s why in the article, we break down the key details, as well as provide an in-depth comparison to help guide your decision.

Key Details at a Glance:

Here are the side by side specs of the Canon T6 and the Canon T7:

Canon T6 Canon T7
Price New: $462 (Body Only) New: $469 (Body Only)
Release Date 3/10/2016 2/26/2018
Sensor 18MP APS-C CMOS 24MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen No No
LCD Screen Size 3 3
Viewfinder Resolution 920k 920k
Lens Type EF/EF-S Mount EF/EF-S Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 3.0 fps 3.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920 x 1080 1920 x 1080
Weather sealed No No
Image Stabilization No No
ISO Range 100-6400 100-6400
Low Light ISO 781 1009
Battery Life 500 Shots 500 Shots
Time-Lapse Recording No No
Touchscreen No No
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection No No
Microphone Port No No
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 326 326
Dimensions 129x101x78mm 129x101x78mm
Weight 485g 475g

Detailed Comparison

While the specs can give you an idea of what each camera is equipped with, this detailed comparison will help demonstrate how these features function during camera usage. Since both of these models are entry-level, they both feature a broad range of functions to help introduce users to DSLR photography.

The Canon T6 precedes the Canon T7 by two years, and per Canon tradition, these models take features from previous-generation higher-end models. With this in mind, both of these cameras are tuned to meet the needs of beginner photographers.

Rather than having a group of features focused on catering to one specialty, these cameras do a great job at offering an array of options to help photographers become acquainted with DSLR photography.

Design & Battery Life

At a glance, these camera bodies look identical. The Canon Rebel series has a classic design, and both the Canon T6 and the Canon T7 follow the same pattern.

Both of these models have external dimensions of 129 x 101 x 78mm. The Canon T6 weighs 485g, whereas the Canon T7 comes in slightly lighter at 475g. While weight does play a role in decision making, the slight difference between these models is probably not noticeable.

Both cameras feature a 3’’ fixed screen, so neither are flexible for shooting at odd angles. The Canon T6 and the Canon T7 also do not feature touch screen technology.

Another similar aspect of these cameras is their lens mount. Both cameras use an EF/EF-S mount, which provides users 326 lenses to choose from.

Neither camera has a weather-sealed body, and this is important for anyone who wants to take outdoor or nature shots. These cameras are fine to use on clear, sunny days, but you will have to be careful in other conditions.

One of the major design differences is in the sensor. The Canon T6 features an 18.0MP APS-C CMOS, and the Canon T7 adds more megapixels with its 24.0MP APS-C CMOS. The Canon T7 allows for more flexibility with printing larger images, as well as letting you crop more freely.

Autofocus System & Continuous Shooting Performance

Jumping into one of the more technical features of these models, the Canon T6 and the Canon T7 feature similar autofocus systems. Both of these cameras have a 9-point autofocus system, which is a great starting place for beginners.

This autofocus system is perfect for helping amateurs learn the ropes, so it is best used with still subjects instead of action shots. It is also important to keep in mind that the autofocus system slows down in lower lights situations.

As for continuous shooting speeds, these models both feature 3.0 fps. This lower number means these cameras are best used for daily photography, and the slow continuous speed may hinder action shots.

Overall, neither model has an advantage over the other with these features. They are both great cameras for stepping into DSLR and becoming familiar with autofocus and continuous shooting speeds.

Image Quality

The Canon T6 and the Canon T7 are both known for taking great photos in quality lighting, especially with bright and clear conditions. For photographers interested in low light settings, both of these models have an ISO range of 100-6400 that expands to 12800 when needed.

Image Sample for the Canon T6:

Cat on chair

Image via DPReview

This ISO range provides users with options to change up the lighting for shoots, but the higher end of the ISO range tends to have a bit of noise. These cameras are best for daily photography and bright photography, but they still get the job done for low light shots.

Between both of these models, there is not much difference between image quality. They are excellent options for getting the hang of DSLR photography, and their features help beginners understand how the functions will affect image quality.

Image Sample from the Canon T7:

Bridge on river

Image via Onfotolif

Video and Connectivity Features

Most entry-level cameras only offer basic video features, and the Canon T6 and Canon T7 provide the ability to take casual videos. Both cameras can record Full HD videos with 1920×1080 resolution.

Neither camera offers an external sound option though, so videos featuring noise have to be recorded using the internal microphone. These cameras also lack built-in stabilization, so it is a good idea to try a tripod for smooth videos.

As for connectivity, both of these cameras feature the same abilities. They have a built-in wireless connection, which can be used to transfer images between devices. This also allows users to operate the camera remotely from a smartphone.

The Final Verdict

So which camera is the best option for you? At a glance, it is hard to see many differences between the two models. Canon has a solid grasp on producing entry-level cameras, and each newer release only slightly builds upon the last.

The designs of these models are interchangeable, but the Canon T7 does weigh less than the Canon T6. While this won’t make a huge difference to users, it does give the Canon T7 a slight edge.

Another plus for the Canon T7 is the added megapixels in its sensor. This does provide photographers more freedom during cropping and lets you print larger photos.

Both of these models feature the same autofocus system and continuous shooting speed, which are great for beginners. Their image quality is also almost interchangeable, but the bigger sensor of the Canon T7 may cause some differences in shots.

Overall, these are two solid cameras for entry-level photographers. The Canon T6 is cheaper than the Canon T7, so it is the best choice out of the two for the price. If you can find the Canon T7 on sale though, it is worth the upgrade for the sensor.

Canon 77D vs 80D

Canon 77D vs 80D: The Complete Comparison

Canon 77D vs 80D: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we compare the differences between the Canon 77D and 80D, so you can decide which camera is the best model for you.

Released just one year apart, and being relatively close in price, the many similarities between the Canon 77D and Canon 80D are to be expected. The two models share many of the same features such as megapixel size, LCD screen and articulation, video resolution, and more.

Yet, there are a few key differences between the cameras which may be important to you depending on what type of photography you shoot and the features you need. Features such as weatherproofing, continuous shooting speed, shutter speed, and body design separate the two cameras.

Whether you’re a photographer tacking the plunge and upgrading to the 77D or 80D from your entry-level camera or an intermediate to an advanced photographer looking for a highly capable camera at a mid-range price, this guide covers the key details and difference between both cameras so you can decide which model is right for you.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

The following chart shows the side by side specs of the Canon 77D and the Canon 80D:

Canon 77D Canon 80D
Price New: $750, Used: $630 (Body Only) New: $900, Used: $800 (Body Only)
Release Date 2/15/2017 2/18/2018
Sensor 24MP APS-C CMOS 24MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen Yes Yes
LCD Screen Size 3” 3’’
Viewfinder Resolution 1040k 1040k
Lens Type Canon EF/EF-S Canon EF/EF-S
Continuous Shooting Speed 6.0 fps 7.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920 x 1080 1920 x 1080
Weather sealed No Yes
Image Stabilization No No
ISO Range 100-25600 (expandable to 51200) 100-16000 (expandable to 25600)
Low Light ISO 971 1135
Battery Life 600 Shots 960 Shots
Time-Lapse Recording Yes Yes
Touchscreen Yes Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD Yes Yes
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes No
Microphone Port Yes Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 326 326
Dimensions 131x100x76mm 139x105x79mm
Weight 540g 730g

Detailed Comparison

Taking a look at the side-by-sides specs for these two cameras can help you get a quick overview of their differences, but it’s always helpful to dive deeper.

In this section, we’ll cover how these cameras compare on design, battery life, connectivity, weatherproofing, and pricing.

Design & Battery Life

One of the biggest differences between these two models is their size, weight, and battery life.

When it comes to body size, the Canon 80D is slightly larger coming in at 139x105x79mm vs. the 77D at 131x100x76mm.

2 Cameras Comparison

Image via Apotelyt

This is not a huge size difference but may bother those with smaller hands or for the photographer who is concerned about portability. The bigger differentiator when it comes to the design of these two cameras is the weight.

Despite being a year older, the Canon 77D weighs nearly 200g less than the 80D. The 77D weighs 540g while the 80D weighs 730g.

This added weight can take its toll on long shoots and/or anytime where you have your camera in your hand during the entire shoot.

Camera in hand

Image via Imaging Resource

Where the 80D does win out, though, is on battery life. The 80D can take an impressive 960 shots on one battery charge vs. just 600 shots on the 77D. While both cameras can shoot more on one battery than many cheaper DSLR models and even mirrorless models, the 80D is the clear winner when it comes to battery life.

So if you need a camera that will last a long time on one battery, and want to cut down on the number of batteries you need to bring to your next shoot, the 80D is the choice for you.

Continuous Shooting Speed & Shutter Speed

Another big differentiator between the 77D and 80D is the continuous shooting speeds on each of these cameras. Shooting at 7 fps, the Canon 80D is able to handle a full 1 fps more than the 77D at 6 fps.

This may not seem like a big difference to some, but for those photographers who are in sports or wildlife photography, that extra frame per second can mean the difference between capturing a key moment in crisp detail or missing it entirely. Wedding and event photographers will likely appreciate the shooting speed as well so they can make they capture a vital moment as clearly as possible.

To sweeten the pot, the 80D is also capable of shooting at shutter speeds up to 1/8000s whereas the 77D is only capable of shutter speeds up to 1/4000s.

For photographers who need a fast camera, the 80D is the clear winner.

Weatherproofing

For landscape and nature photographers, or just anyone who wants to be able to use their camera outside in wet and/or rainy conditions, the 80D will be the best choice between these two models.

Weatherproofing

Image via TbonesTech

The Canon 80D camera body is weather-sealed, meaning it will be resistant to rain and wet conditions (not completely waterproof), while the 77D is not.

Connectivity

While both camera models are equipped with built-in wireless connectivity, oddly missing on the newer Canon 80D is Bluetooth connection. The older Canon 77D, does have Bluetooth, however.

So if you want the ability to use your camera with a Bluetooth device, go with the 77D.

Pricing

Being released in 2017, the Canon 77D can be hard to find new, but there many used options out there. If you’re considering buying used, the Canon 77D is definitely the winner on price.

A Canon 77D camera body can be found for as low as $500 to $550 (with the average about $630), whereas the 80D usually comes in at $650 to $700 at its lowest (with the average about $800).

If price is a concern, and you want to secure the cheapest camera possible between these two models, then the 77D is the best choice for you.

The Final Verdict

Ultimately, both of these two models, the Canon 77D and 80D are very similar cameras, which is to be expected being released not too far apart and relatively close in price. Both cameras have a touchscreen LCD that is 3” in size, full HD video recording (but no 4K), built-in flash, a microphone port, 24 megapixels, the list goes on.

The big differences are in the size and weight of these two cameras, Bluetooth connectivity, shooting speed, and battery life.

If you’re a sport, wedding, event, wildlife, or any other photographer who needs the fastest camera possible to capture critical moments, then the 80D is your best bet. While priced slightly higher than the 77D, the higher fps and shutter speed will provide you with the best tool to capture fast-moving objects. Additionally, the performance in battery life will ensure you don’t run out of juice mid-shoot.

However, if you’re concerned about price, require Bluetooth connectivity, or want the lightest, most compact camera between the two models, the 77D will be the camera for you. Its smaller design and weight will make carrying this camera easier on you throughout your shoots and easier to pack. Which will be nice, since you’ll save nearly $100 to $150 on this camera (when buying used), so it’ll offset the added weight in your wallet (metaphorically speaking of course :))

Nikon D7200 vs D7500

Nikon D7200 vs.D7500: The Ultimate Comparison

Nikon D7200 vs. D7500: The Ultimate Comparison

In this article, we break down the differences between the Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500, so you can decide which is the best camera for you.

The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are both mid-range DSLR cameras, marketed for a range of photographers from advanced amateurs to enthusiasts, as well as professionals who are looking for a lower price point.

The Nikon D7500 was released in 2017, which was two years after the Nikon D7200 hit the market. While the Nikon D7500 definitely benefits from newer technology, the Nikon D7200 does bring its own perks to the table.

Since these models are pretty similar, this article breaks down the key features on each camera to help you make the best decision between the two.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

The following chart shows the side-by-side specs of the Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500.

Nikon D7200 Nikon D7500
Price New: $694.00 New: $996.95
Release Date 3/2/2015 4/12/2017
Sensor APS-C CMOS APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen Fixed Tilting
LCD Screen Size 3.2’’ 3.2’’
Viewfinder Resolution 1229k dots 922k dots
Lens Type Nikon F Nikon F
Continuous Shooting Speed 6.0 fps 8.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920×1080 3840×2160
Weather sealed Yes Yes
Image Stabilization No Yes
Dynamic Range 14.0 14.0
Low Light ISO 1333 1483
Battery Life 1100 shots 950 Shots
Time-Lapse Recording Yes Yes
Touchscreen No Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection No Yes
Microphone Port Yes Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 326 326
Dimensions 136 x 107 x 76mm 136 x 104 x 73mm
Weight 765g 720g

Detailed Comparison

The above chart with side-by-side specs is a great way to quickly see which camera is a better fit, but this detailed comparison breaks down how these features function within the cameras. Since these cameras are so similar, it is important to understand how the differences affect each model’s performance.

Stepping up into the mid-range level of DSLR cameras comes with more perks than beginner models, but it also means that you need a deeper understanding of how each camera works. As a major player in the camera market, Nikon is a great place to start when it comes to the advanced game.

The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are both powerhouse cameras, especially when it comes to speed and low light shooting, so they are great for tackling several different genres. Despite their differences, both of these cameras are great options for advanced enthusiasts who are ready to step up their equipment.

Design & Battery Life

The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are extremely similar in design, as the D7500 was the replacement for the older D7200. Both of these cameras feature the traditional Nikon DSLR body.

The Nikon D7200 is 136x107x76mm, and the Nikon D7500 136x107x73mm, which makes them almost identical in shape. The Nikon D7200 is 765g, and the Nikon D7500 comes in at 720g, so a little bit lighter than its predecessor.
Design & Battery Life Nikon D7500 vs D7200

Image via Camera Decision

Both of these cameras have a 3.2’’ LCD screen, but the Nikon D7500 features a tilting screen for more flexibility when shooting, whereas the Nikon D7200 has a fixed screen. The Nikon D7500 also benefits from newer technology by having a touch screen, while the Nikon D7200 screen is not.

Since the Nikon D7500 is the replacement for the Nikon D7200, both of these cameras feature a Nikon F mount. With this lens mount, there are 309 available lenses to choose from. Combined with the features of these cameras, this makes for some serious range when it comes to shooting.

Both of these cameras are weather-sealed, so they can handle any tough environments while shooting. This makes these cameras great for outdoors and nature photography.

Despite the Nikon D7500 being the newer model, the Nikon D7200 is superior when it comes to battery life. The Nikon D7200 can take 1.100 shots per charge, and the Nikon D7500 can handle 950. With over 100 more shots, the Nikon D7200 is a solid choice if you want to maximize camera usage between charges.

Autofocus System & Camera Speed

Both of these cameras feature impressive, and similar, autofocus systems. The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 have 51-points in their AF systems, and they are both sensitive to -3EV.

Each of these systems feature AF Tracking, so they are great options for sports and action photography.
Girl Face Autofocus

Image via Photography Life

The Nikon D7200 has a continuous shooting speed of 6.0 fps to help capture action at a quick pace, but the Nikon D7500 steps it up to an impressive 8.0 fps, making it superior when it comes to fast photography.

The Nikon D7500 also allows for RAW image bursts, so you can take multiple pictures in this format without slowing down your shoot. This is great for photographers who prefer to shoot in RAW, but don’t want to be hindered by slow buffering.

Overall, both of these cameras are excellent choices when it comes to autofocus systems, especially for action and sports photography, and the Nikon D7500 is the better choice for those who value speed.

Image Quality & Low Light Performance

The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are powerful cameras that produce high-quality images at the mid-range price point. Both of these cameras can cross genres and produce good pictures for each type, but they do their best work in action situations.

The Nikon D7500 features image stabilization, unlike the Nikon D7200, which makes it the better choice for those who want the camera to help with shaky pictures during action and still shots.

Image Sample from the Nikon D7200:

Nikon D7200 Image sample

Image via DPReview

Another plus for the Nikon D7500 is its anti-flicker filter, which helps reduce uneven color and spotty exposure in uneven lighting. This is great for photographers who like to experiment with lighting, but want the camera to help correct the images.

When it comes to low-light shooting, both the Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are beasts with incredible ISO abilities, but the Nikon D7500 wins out again in this category. The Nikon D7200 has an ISO range of 100-25600, which can be expanded to 100-102400. The Nikon D7500 has a range of 100-51200, and this can be expanded to 50-164000.

Image Sample from the Nikon D7500:

Nikon D7500 Image sample

Image via HaveCameraWillTravel

Both of these cameras feature built-in flash and external flash options, which is also a plus for working in difficult light situations. With the ability to choose between the built-in flash or to attach a flash, it’s easy to customize this to meet the needs of your shoot.

While both of these ranges allow for some serious low light action, the Nikon D7500 is the better choice for photographers who plan on working with changing light environments.

Connectivity & Creative Features

Both of these cameras benefit from advanced technology when it comes to their connectivity features. The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 feature WiFi connection, so you can transfer images between devices when connected to the internet.

The Nikon D7500 also features Bluetooth connection, which allows for image transfer via devices connected over Bluetooth with no internet required. This is a plus for those who want to quickly transfer pictures during shoots, but don’t want the hassle of being tied to an area with internet access.

Both cameras feature Smartphone remotes that can be accessed through an app, and this is great for those who want to do hands-free shoots or capture pictures from difficult angles. The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 both have a time-lapse feature, so you can get creative with this setting.

Overall, these cameras are compatible with other devices for easy image transfer, but the Nikon D7500 has the advantage when it comes to Bluetooth connection.

Final Thoughts

The Nikon D7200 and the Nikon D7500 are powerhouse cameras that provide a range of features for advanced enthusiasts and semi-professional photographers.

The Nikon D7200 is the cheaper of the two options, whereas the Nikon D7500 runs about $200 more for a used body. If you’re looking for the lowest price, the Nikon D7200 is the way to go. If you want to get the most features out of your dollar though, the Nikon D7500 is the best choice.

Overall, the Nikon D7500 has significant advantages when it comes to ISO range, speed, and connection, but the Nikon D7200 is a great deal for those who want the cheapest option.

Canon T6 vs T6i

Canon T6 vs. T6i: The Complete Comparison

Canon T6 vs. T6i: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we breakdown the differences between the Canon T6 and the Canon T6i, so you can decide which one is the best fit for your needs.

The Canon T6 and the Canon T6i are both entry-level DSLR cameras that were released within 13 months of each other. These cameras are targeted towards beginners and amateurs who are ready to venture into the DSLR game.

Both of these models are versions of Canon’s entry-most DSLR cameras, and they share many similarities between them. The main difference between these cameras is the price, as the Canon T6 was released at a significantly lower price point than the Canon T6i, but there are several advantages to the Canon T6i that are worth paying a bit more for.

Despite being the older model, at a glance, the Canon T6i has a slight edge compared to the Canon T6, but we break down the basics of each model to help you decide which will be a better fit for your photography needs.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

The following chart shows the side by side specs of the Canon T6 and the Canon T6i:

Canon T6: Canon T6i:
Price New: $462, Used: $415 (Body Only) New: $550
Release Date 3/10/2016 2/6/2015
Sensor 18MP APS-C CMOS 24MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen No Yes
LCD Screen Size 3 3
Viewfinder Resolution 921k 1040k
Lens Type EF/EF-S Mount Ef/EF-S Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 3.0 fps 5.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920×1080 1920×1080
Weather sealed No No
Image Stabilization No No
ISO Range 100-6400 100-12800
Low Light ISO 781 919
Battery Life 500 Shots 440 Shots
Time-Lapse Recording No No
Touchscreen No Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No Yes
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection No Yes
Microphone Port No Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 326 326
Dimensions 129x101x78mm 132x101x78mm
Weight 485g 555g

Detailed Comparison

While the side-by-side specs are an easy way to get an overview of the similarities and differences between these two cameras, this detailed comparison will help illustrate how these features function in everyday use.

Every major camera brand has their own DSLR line, filled with different entry-level models, and most of these cameras cater to different kinds of photographers depending on their key features. The Canon T6 and the Canon T6i are models that can work for a variety of genres, but the Canon T6i provides a bit more flexibility for photographers who want to be able to do it all.

As with most entry-level cameras, neither the Canon T6 or Canon T6i features a speciality area, but rather, they both bring an assortment of functions to help beginners become acquainted with DSLR photography.

Design & Battery Life

Despite both of these cameras being part of Canon’s entry-level line, their designs contain enough differences to be considered a deciding factor for some. The Canon T6 is 129x101x78mm, whereas the Canon T6i measures at 132x101x78mm. The difference in thickness can be attributed to the Canon T6i’s articulating LCD screen.

Both of these models feature a 3’’ LCD screen, and the Canon T6i is a touch screen. For those who want flexibility when it comes to the LCD screen, the Canon T6i is the better camera. The fully articulating screen allows for smooth movements in all angles, and can be a huge help for those who want to take selfies or use the screen for vlogging.
Canon T6 vs T6I Design & Battery Life

Image via Apotelyt

The Canon T6 weighs 485g, and the Canon T6i comes in at 555g. There is a slight difference in camera weight, but this does change depending on the lenses used. Both of these cameras utilize a Canon EF/EF-S Mount, which means they are compatible with 326 lenses.

Both of these cameras feature built-in and external flash options, which makes them great choices for photographers who want flexibility with their lighting equipment. The Canon T6i, features an external microphone port, whereas the Canon T6 does not, so the Canon T6i is the better choice for those who want higher sound quality when using the video functions.

The Canon T6 has a battery life of about 500 shots per charge, and the Canon T6i’s battery life is about 440 shots per charge. For those who want to get the most out of each charge, the Canon T6 is the stronger choice because it allows about 60 more shots than the Canon T6i.

Autofocus System & Camera Speed

These cameras have very clear differences between their autofocus systems. The Canon T6 features a 9-point system, and the Canon T6i tops that with a 19-point system. While they both operate similarly, the Canon T6i features 10 extra points to help lock in subjects during shoots.

The Canon T6’s continuous shooting speed is 3.0 fps, while the Canon T6 clocks in at 5.0 fps. With a difference of 2.0 fps, the Canon T6i trumps the Canon T6 for those who want the quickest performance during shoots.
Duck in the water

Image via DPReview

With a higher number of autofocus points and a faster speed, the Canon T6i is better for photographers who plan on doing action or sports photography. Neither of these cameras feature image stabilization, though, so it is important to keep that in mind when shooting fast-paced subjects.

Image Quality & Low Light Performance

For entry-level cameras, both the Canon T6 and the Canon T6i create solid images. These cameras are known for their even and natural color portrayal, and they both are on par with most beginner models.

Image Sample from the Canon T6:

Canon T6 Image

Image via Imaging-Resource

The differences can be seen mostly in their low-light performances, as the ISO range is significantly higher on the Canon T6i. The Canon T6 features a range of 100-6400, which can be expanded to 12800. The Canon T6i’s native ISO range is 100-12800, and can be expanded up to 25600.

With a higher range and double the expansion of the Canon T6, the Canon T6i outperforms the Canon T6 in low light situations. The Canon T6 is slow to focus in dim lighting, and noise appears in darker environments.

Image Sample from the Canon T6i:

Canon T6I Image

Image via ExploreCams

When it comes to versatility and allowing for flexibility in lighting situations, the Canon T6i is the clear winner between these two models.

Connectivity Features

Since both of these models come from the entry-level Canon line, the Canon T6 and the Canon T6i share similar connection ability. Both of these cameras feature built-in wireless connection, which makes it possible to seamlessly transfer images between devices.

The Canon T6 and the Canon T6i both utilize NFC connection, and this feature also helps with image transfer between connected devices. Neither the Canon T6 or the Canon T6i have built-in bluetooth connection, which means image transfer through other features is a bit slower.

Both of these cameras can be connected to smartphones for remote usage, which is helpful for photographers who want the ability to easily take hands-free photos.

The Final Verdict

While both of these cameras are great entry-level models, the Canon T6i is the clear winner when it comes to speed, autofocus, low-light performance, and design features. At a lower price point, the Canon T6 is a solid choice for those who want to spend a little less on their cameras, but still have access to the basic functions of a DSLR.

The Canon T6 is also a great choice for those who want a longer lasting battery and lighter equipment for long shoots. The Canon T6i is perfect for entry-level photographers who want to be able to try it all, but plan to do action or sports photography.

Overall, these models are both cheap and efficient, but the Canon T6i is definitely the better camera.

Nikon D3500 vs. Canon T6: The Ultimate Comparison

Nikon D3500 vs. Canon T6: The Ultimate Comparison

In this article, we break down the differences between the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T6, so you can decide which camera is best for you.

The Nikon D3500 and the Canon T6 are both entry-level DSLR cameras from two of the best camera brands on the market. These cameras are targeted for amateurs and enthusiasts who are ready to step into the DSLR photography game.

With two years between their release dates, the Nikon D3500 has a slight edge when it comes to technology advances, but the Canon T6 manages to hold its own with Canon’s signature features. Both of these models start at some of the lowest price points for DSLR style cameras, and they have similar features that are aimed towards helping beginner photographers get used to the DSLR format.

Although there are a lot of similarities between these models, in this article we take the time to highlight the differences, so you can choose which model is best for you!

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

The following chart shows the side-by-side specs of the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T6:

Nikon D3500 Canon T6
Price New: $470, Used: $365 (Body Only) New: $462, Used: $415 (Body Only)
Release Date 8/29/2018 3/10/2016
Sensor 24MP APS-C CMOS 18MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen No No
LCD Screen Size 3 3
Viewfinder Resolution 2359k 921k
Lens Type Nikon F Mount EF/EF-S Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 5.0 fps 3.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920×1080 1920×1080
Weather sealed No No
Image Stabilization No No
ISO Range 100-25600 100-6400
Low Light ISO 25,600 12,800
Battery Life 1,550 Shots 500 Shots
Time Lapse Recording No No
Touchscreen No No
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection No Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes No
Microphone Port No No
AE Bracketing No Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 305 321
Dimensions 124x97x70mm 129x101x78mm
Weight 365g 485g

Detailed Comparison

The side-by-side specs are a great way of seeing the major differences between the cameras at a quick glance, but this detailed comparison helps illustrate how these differences function between the models.

Taking the plunge into DSLR photography is exciting, but with so many entry-level options, the process of picking a camera is daunting. Going with the Nikon D3500 or the Canon T6 is a great place to start since these brands dominate the market, which can help create a seamless transition into DSLR equipment.

Both of these cameras are entry-level models, which means they are great for beginners (and enthusiasts) who want a basic camera that can conquer many different types of photography. Both of these cameras are equipped with the ability to help photographers master the technique of DSLR cameras.

Design & Battery Life

Nikon and Canon both have signature designs that can be a huge deciding factor when it comes to picking out a camera. Nikon and Canon are known for implementing their classic designs throughout their models, so if you have a preference towards either brand, the Nikon D3500 and Canon T6 will be no exception.

The Nikon D3500 is 124 x 97 x 70mm, and it weighs 365g, whereas the Canon T6 is 129 x 101 x 78mm, and 485g. The size differences are small in measurement, but the Nikon D3500 is a bit thinner and sleeker than the Canon T6, as well as lighter. If you want a camera that is lightweight, and more compact, the Nikon D3500 is the better choice.

Along with their sizes, both of these cameras feature 3’’ fixed LCD screens, so neither of them allow flexibility with shooting angles. Both of these models lack environmental sealing, which means they neither are a good choice if you plan to shoot in extreme weather conditions.

While their size difference comes down to the photographer’s preference in equipment handling, a big difference between these models is the battery life. The Canon T6 has a battery life of 500 shots, which is pretty impressive and allows for lengthy shoots between charging.

The Nikon D3500 is the clear winner when it comes to battery life, though. It can take up to 1,550 shots on a single charge, which is amazing for entry-level photographers who want to take a lot of pictures during each shoot.

Autofocus System & Performance

These cameras are well-rounded models that have a little bit of every DSLR feature, including autofocus systems and quick continuous shooting speeds. Overall, these are great cameras to help photographers get used to utilizing these features during shoots, but there are some differences between both cameras.

The Nikon D3500 features an autofocus system with 11-points, while the Canon T6’s system operates with 9-points. Both of these are good systems to start with, since they cover the middle of the frame, but aren’t too distracting while shooting. The Nikon D3500 has the upperhand with a few extra focus points.

The Canon T6 has a continuous shooting speed of 3.0 fps, so it is better suited for still subjects and landscape photography. It is possible to capture action shots with this camera, but it won’t be able to take as many frames as higher price point DSLRs.

If you plan on doing more action photography, the Nikon D3500 is the better choice between the two cameras. The Nikon D3500 features a continuous shooting speed of 5.0 fps.

Image Quality & Low Light Performance

For entry-level cameras, the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T6 both produce solid images. The Canon T6 features an 18-MP APS-C CMOS sensor, and the Nikon D3500 features a 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor. While these sensors produce similar results, the extra 6MP gives a lot more freedom when it comes to cropping and printing larger images.

Image Sample from the Nikon D3500:

Image Sample from the Nikon D3500

Image via DPReview

Neither of these cameras feature image stabilization, so it’s important to keep this in mind when planning shoots that require a lot of handling. You may need to invest in other equipment, like a tripod, to reduce image shake when using either model.

In low light situations, the Nikon D3500 pulls ahead compared to the Canon T6. The Canon T6 features an ISO range of 100-6400, and it can expand to 12,800 in low light situations. On the other hand, the Nikon D3500’s ISO range is 100-25,400, which provides a bit more ability for quality low light images.

Image Sample from the Canon T6:

Image Sample from the Canon T6

Image via Imaging-Resourcing

For low light situations, both of these cameras feature built-in flash options, as well as external flash attachments. The built-in options have slight differences in their ability, as the Nikon D3500 has a range of 7.0m, and the Canon T6 has a larger range of 9.2m. If you plan to utilize a flash attachment, you can achieve the same range of flash on either model.

The Nikon D3500 removes the anti-aliasing filter that some cameras have, which means it has a higher ability to retain fine detail. The Canon T6 does feature an anti-aliasing filter though, and it reduces moire in photos.

Connection Features

Modern DSLR cameras typically have the ability to connect via Bluetooth or WiFi to other devices to provide for easy image transfer.

The Nikon D3500 features Bluetooth connection with Nikon’s SnapBridge technology, which allows the connection through a smartphone app to quickly share images between devices. This is a great feature if you plan on sharing images with just one device, but if you require WiFi for image transfer, the Nikon D3500 isn’t the best choice,

The Canon T6 takes a different approach to image transfer, as it utilizes WiFi connection to share images between multiple connected devices. This feature is handy if you’re around WiFi to share, but the Canon T6 lacks Bluetooth connectivity, so it doesn’t work well for on-the-go image transfer.

Both of these cameras can connect to an app to allow remote control with your smartphone. This is convenient for photographers who want to use a tripod, or any kind of set-up, that requires a remote trigger.

The Final Verdict

Both of these cameras are stellar entry-level models, but the Nikon D3500 has a significant advantage over the Canon T6 in several categories.

The Nikon D3500 is great for any photographer who wants a camera that performs well in low light and has super long battery life. It is also a great fit for photographers who want a lighter model when traveling or conducting shoots that require a lot of equipment handling.

If you want a camera that has a reliable connection across multiple devices, along with comparable speed, image quality, and autofocus ability, then the Canon T6 is a good choice.

Overall, the Nikon D3500 is the better choice when it comes to features and performance.

Nikon Z6 Vs Sony A7 III

Nikon Z6 vs. Sony A7 III: The Ultimate Comparison

Nikon Z6 vs. Sony A7 III: The Ultimate Comparison

In this article, we break down the differences between these two cameras to help you decide which is the best choice to fit your needs.

The Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III are both full-frame mirrorless cameras made for the enthusiast market, but each of these cameras is well-rounded enough that advanced photographers and professionals will be impressed with their abilities.

The Nikon Z6 is Nikon’s first step into the full-frame camera game, while the Sony A7 III is one of Sony’s well established full-frame models.

With both of these cameras being released in the same year and being in the same price range, there are slight differences in design and performance to help you decide which camera is the better fit. Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to find out if the Nikon Z6 or the Sony A7 III is the best option for you.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

Below are the side-by-side specs of the Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III:

Nikon Z6 Sony a7 III
Price New: $1596.00 New: $1,998.00, Used: $1,700
Release Date 8/23/2018 2/27/2018
Sensor 25MP Full Frame BSI CMOS 24MP Full-Frame BSI-CMOS
Viewfinder EVF EVF
Articulating LCD Screen Yes Yes
LCD Screen Size 3.2 3
Viewfinder Resolution 3690k 2359k
Lens Type Nikon Z Mount Sony E Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 12.0 fps 10.0 fps
Video Resolution 3840×2160 3840×2160
Weather sealed Yes Yes
Image Stabilization Yes Sensor-Shift
Color Depth 25.3 25.0
Dynamic Range 14.3 14.7
Low Light ISO 3299 3730
Battery Life 330 shots 610 shots
Time Lapse Recording Yes Yes
Touchscreen Yes Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes Yes
Microphone Port Yes Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash No No
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 15 116 (72 Full Frame)
Dimensions 134x101x68mm 127x96x74mm
Weight 675g 650g

In-Depth Comparison

The Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III are both full-frame mirrorless cameras marketed towards semi-professionals and enthusiasts who want a camera that can perform at a wide range. The Nikon Z6 is Nikon’s attempt to break into the full-frame mirrorless category, while the Sony A7 III is Sony’s third generation of this camera type.

The Nikon Z6 is a powerhouse debut, proving Nikon has the ability to tap into the full-frame mirrorless market, but how does it stack up against the Sony A7 III?

Design

Both of these cameras stay true to their brands signature design. The Nikon Z6 can be described as a mirrorless version of the Nikon 750 DSLR, so it is a great choice for photographers who are already comfortable with the Nikon layout.

The Sony A7 III is a sleeker, compact full-frame model that features a deep grip for easy handling. Sticking with a familiar layout for the Sony A7 series, the Sony A7 III is a solid option for Sony enthusiasts.

Sony cameraImage via Fotocare

Both of these cameras feature articulating touch screen LCD screens, but the Nikon Z6 is slightly larger (3.2’’ compared to the Sony A7 III’s 3.0’’ screen size). Since the screens are fully articulated, both of these cameras are great for catching photos at different angles. Each of these cameras are relatively light for full-frame models, but the Sony A7 III comes in at 650g, making it the lighter option for those who want a more agile model.

The Nikon Z6 is weather-sealed, which means it can handle tough conditions during outdoor shoots. The Sony A7 III makes claims to be weather-resistant meaning it may be the more durable option for outdoor photographers.

Nikon camera

Image via Imaging Resource

Since the Nikon Z6 is Nikon’s first model in the full-frame series, Nikon decided to go with a new lens mount design known as the Nikon Z mount, which means there are only 15 lens options for this model. The Sony A7 III uses the Sony E mount, and features 116 lenses, 72 of which are full-frame options.

Speed & Performance

The Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III are two well-rounded machines built to go the distance during long shoots. With quick continuous shooting speeds, these cameras are great for action and outdoor photographers.

Compared to the Nikon Z6 and its battery life of 330 shots, the Sony A7 III has a battery life of 610 shots, which makes it the obvious choice for photographers who plan on doing longer shoots.

The Nikon Z6 has an impressive continuous shooting speed of 12.0fps, so it is definitely the quicker option. The Sony A7 III comes in with a speed of 10.0 fps, which is still quick for those who want to use it for action pictures. Both of these models are ideal for action and sports photographers, but the Nikon Z6’s speed makes it the better option of the two.

Action Image Example from the Nikon Z6:
Players playing in the ground

Image via DPReview

While the Nikon Z6 wins out in continuous shooting speed, the buffer capacity of the Sony A7 III is much higher than the Nikon Z6. The Sony A7 III can take 40 uncompressed RAW images, 89 compressed RAW images, or 177 JPEGs in a single burst, whereas the Nikon Z6 is only able to take 37 uncompressed RAW images or 44 JPEGs.

With the higher buffer capacity and almost double the battery life of the Nikon Z6, the Sony A7 III is the better choice between these two cameras if your biggest deciding factor is long-lasting and quick performance.

Autofocus & Image Quality

Another key difference between these two cameras is the autofocus system. While both of them have impressive autofocus ability, the Sony A7 III has a system of 693-points, which cover most of the full-frame. The Nikon Z6’s system features 273-points, which cover about 90% of the frame.

The Nikon Z6’s autofocus system comes with impressive ability, like its 3D tracking system and low light ability. This camera can autofocus as low as -4EV in low light mode, which makes it a great choice for photographers who plan on shooting in a range of lighting scenarios.

The Sony A7 III performs as one of the best cameras on the market for low-light shooting. This camera has excellent noise-reduction, and produces sharp images at low EV levels. The Nikon Z6 has less noise-reduction ability than the Sony A7 III, but it does strike a balance between detail and noise, making it a solid competitor to the Sony.

Image Example from the Sony A7 III:

Golden Statues

Image via Have Camera Will Travel

Video Features & Quality

Video is one area where there isn’t much difference between these two cameras. Both the Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III can shoot at 3840×2160 up to 30fps, with the option for 120 fps in high speed.

The Nikon Z6 and the Sony A7 III’s autofocus systems make for smooth autofocus during shooting, but the Nikon Z6 does shoot in ‘silent’ mode when utilizing autofocus, so there is less noise interruption.

Final Thoughts

The Sony A7 III and the Nikon Z6 are impressive full-frame cameras for mid-level and advanced photographers. These cameras bring a well-rounded set of features that will help meet the needs of most action and outdoor photographers, as well as the ability to perform well in low-light situations.

For those who are fans of Nikon’s design and are willing to invest in the Nikon Z lenses, the Nikon Z6 is the way to go. With a similar design of the Nikon D750 adapted to its full-frame ability, the Nikon Z6 is the go-to choice for Nikon enthusiasts.

For fans of Sony, the Sony A7 III expands upon the features of the Sony A7 generation, and provides versatile features that can meet the needs of any advanced photographer.

As far as speed and performance are concerned, the Nikon Z6 caters to the needs of action photographers with an impressive burst rate and reliable AF system. The Sony A7 III shines in areas of buffer capacity and full-frame AF coverage, which means it the better choice for those who want more images from each burst.

Overall, both of these cameras are exceptional, well-rounded options for full-frame models. The Nikon Z6 is an impressive powerhouse best suited for those who want quick continuous shooting, and the Sony A7 III is perfect for those seeking a long-lasting battery and impressive low-light image performance.

Nikon D3500 vs Canon T7

Nikon D3500 vs. Canon T7: The Complete Comparison

Nikon D3500 vs. Canon T7: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we break down the differences between the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7, so you can decide which camera and brand is the best fit for you.

The Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 are both entry-level DSLR cameras that are great for beginner photographers and enthusiasts who are ready to upgrade into the DSLR category.

Nikon and Canon are two top camera brands in the photography industry, so their entry-level cameras are a great place to start for beginners who are ready to jump into the world of DSLR photography.

While these cameras seem pretty similar for entry-level devices and start at similar price points, there are a few differences that can help determine which is the better option. To help you find the best fit for your needs, we break down the key details and show a side-by-side detailed comparison of each camera.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

Here are the side-by-side specs of the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7:

Nikon D3500 Canon T7
Price New: $396.95 New: $399.00
Release Date 8/29/2018 2/26/2018
Sensor 24MP APS-C CMOS 24MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen No No
LCD Screen Size 3 3
Viewfinder Resolution 2359k 920k
Lens Type Nikon F Mount EF/EF-S Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 5.0 fps 3.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920×1080 1920×1080
Weather sealed No No
Image Stabilization No No
Dynamic Range Not Tested 100-6400
Low Light ISO Not Tested 12,800
Battery Life 1550 Shots 500 Shots
Time Lapse Recording No No
Touchscreen No No
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection No Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes No
Microphone Port No No
AE Bracketing No Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 305 321
Dimensions 124x97x70mm 129x101x78mm
Weight 365g 475g

In-Depth Comparison

While the key specs may give you an idea of what each camera is equipped with, a detailed comparison of the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 can help you see how those specs function.

The Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 are both entry-level DSLR cameras that are made for beginners and enthusiasts who want to familiarize themselves with the DSLR camera game.

While there are many entry-level DSLR cameras to choose from, the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 showcase two of the most recognizable brands in the photography industry, which is great for beginning photographers.

Design & Battery Life

canon T7 vs Nikon d3500 comparisonImage via Apotelyt

One of the major differences between these two cameras is the body design. As most photographers know, Nikon and Canon are well-known brands with their own classic designs for their cameras, and the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 are no exception.

The Nikon D3500 is an extremely portable and compact camera, which is great for photographers who want to be able to work easily with their camera on the go. The Canon T7 is a bit heavier than the Nikon D3500, but it is still a compact option.

Both of these cameras feature a 3’’ LCD fixed screen, which makes taking pictures from different angles more difficult at times. Neither the Nikon D3500 or the Canon T7 have touchscreen LCD or articulating screens.

Camera and Grass

Image via Digital Camera World

The Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 both utilize an OVF, which allows photographers to have a better view of what they’re shooting, and they allow a “Live View” feature on their LCD screen.

Another big difference between these two cameras is the battery life. While both of these cameras get exceptional battery life for an entry-level DSLR, the Nikon D3500 can last for 1550 shots. The Canon T7 gets about 500 shots per battery, so if being able to run on a long-lasting charge is important to you, then the Nikon D3500 wins big.

Autofocus System & Continuous Shooting Performance

The Nikon D3500 features an 11-point autofocus system, while the Canon T7 works with a 9-point system. Both of these systems are adequate for focusing needs in beginning photography, but the Nikon D3500 has a few extra points to help photographers out.

When it comes to speed, the Nikon D3500 also has the upperhand, as it features a 5.0 fps continuous shooting speed, and the Canon T7 clocks in behind at 3.0 fps. While neither of these cameras are equipped with speeds for action and sports photography, the Nikon D3500 is faster for those wanting a bit more flexibility with subjects in motion.

Image Quality

Both the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 feature a 24MP APS-CMOS sensor, and produce solid images for the entry-level market. The Nikon D3500 has an ISO range of 100-25600, so it can perform in low light conditions.
Image Sample from the Nikon D3500:
Beach Aerial View

Image via DPReview

The Canon T7 has a slightly smaller range at 100-6400, which can be expanded to 100-12800. While both of these cameras are impressive for entry-level gear, the Nikon D3500 outperforms in low light situations.

Image Sample from the Canon T7:

Red Flowers

Image via Canon Camera News

The Nikon D3500 has no AA (anti-aliasing) filter, which means it has the ability to retain finer details, and the Canon T7 does feature an AA filter, so it has less moire in some images.

Connectivity Features

A defining difference between these cameras is their approach to connectivity features. Even with most entry-level cameras now, it’s common to have WiFi or Bluetooth connections, which makes transferring pictures to devices easy.

The Nikon D3500 features Nikon’s SnapBridge technology, which uses a smartphone app and Bluetooth to seamlessly connect devices for image transfer. Although this feature can come in hand, the Nikon D3500 does not have a WiFi connection, which can be a drawback for those wanting to connect with devices in other ways than Bluetooth.

The Canon T7 takes a WiFi and NFC approach to device connection, which gives it the upper hand compared to the Nikon D3500. Since Nikon D3500 can only connect to devices with the SnapBridge app, the Canon T7 is better for those wanting to share images and connect easily with other devices.

The Verdict

Overall, the Nikon D3500 and the Canon T7 are great entry-level DSLR cameras that come at a good price point for beginners. Each camera can act as a solid introduction to their brands, which is great for photographers who are ready to become acquainted with high-end cameras.

The Nikon D3500 packs in a lot of standard Nikon features, and does a good job at hitting all of the important points for entry-level shooting. It is fast, compact, and has a long-lasting battery, making it the perfect choice for photographers who are constantly on the go.

The Canon T7 brings its own set of advantages to the game, as it has better connection features, while still holding its own with speed, design, and portability. Although the Canon T7 is a great choice, the Nikon D3500 wins out between the two when it comes to getting the most for the price.

Nikon Z6 vs. Nikon Z7: The Complete Comparison

Nikon Z6 vs. Nikon Z7: The Complete Comparison

Nikon Z6 vs. Nikon Z7: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we break down the key differences between the Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7, so you can choose the best camera for you.

The Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7 are both full-frame mirrorless cameras that were released to help Nikon stay relevant in the changing market of full-frame cameras. The Nikon Z7 is the more expensive option, and Nikon describes it as “the perfectionist,” whereas the Nikon Z6 is more affordable and can be considered the “all-rounder” of the Nikon line.

While the most obvious difference between these models can be seen in their price points, we did the work for you to find out which option best fits your needs. Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these models is the best option.

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

Here are the side-by-side specs of the Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7:

Nikon Z6 Nikon Z7
Price New: $1596.00 New: $2796.95
Release Date 8/23/2018 8/23/2018
Sensor 25MP Full Frame BSI CMOS 46MP Full Frame BSI CMOS
Viewfinder EVF EVF
Articulating LCD Screen Yes Yes
LCD Screen Size 3.2 3.2
Viewfinder Resolution 3690k 3690k
Lens Type Nikon Z Mount Nikon Z Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 12.0 fps 9.0 fps
Video Resolution 3840×2160 3840×2160
Weather sealed Yes Yes
Image Stabilization Yes Yes
Color Depth 25.3 26.3
Dynamic Range 14.3 14.6
Low Light ISO 3299 2668
Battery Life 330 330
Time Lapse Recording Yes Yes
Touchscreen Yes Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes Yes
Microphone Port Yes Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash No No
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 15 15
Dimensions 134x101x68mm 134x101x68mm
Weight 675g 675g

In-Depth Comparison

Both the Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7 are full-frame mirrorless cameras marketed towards semi-professional and professional photographers. While the Nikon Z6 has an advantage due to its lower price point, the Nikon Z7 comes with full features to make it worth splurging on.

Looking at the specs between the cameras can give you an idea of which is a better fit for your needs, but with cameras that are very similar in features, it comes down to the in-depth analysis of performance to discern which is the better choice.

The main differences between the Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7 are in their continuous shooting speeds, their low light image quality, and their autofocus systems.

Design

Nikon Z6,Z7 Design

Image via Stark Insider

Both the Nikon Z6 and Nikon Z7 are 134x101x68mm and weigh 675g, which makes it hard to choose between the two solely based on their design. As professional-level full-frame cameras, the button design and grip are made with experienced photographers in mind, so these models feature 3 user buttons that can be customized to the photographer’s preferences.

Each camera features a headphone port and microphone port, which helps make these cameras useful for those who want to utilize their video abilities. The option for an external flash is there, but neither camera is equipped with an internal flash.

The LCD screen on both the Nikon Z6 and the Nikon Z7 is a 3.2’’ tilting touch screen. Although it is not fully articulating, the added benefits of a tilting screen is appreciated by users who plan on shooting from different angles.

Performance & Speed

One of the biggest differences seen in the key specs of these cameras is the continuous shooting speed. The Nikon Z6 features a continuous shooting speed of 12.0 fps, whereas the Nikon Z7 has a speed of 9.0 fps. Both of these speeds are fast, but the Nikon Z6 does have the advantage if continuous shooting is a big need in your work.

The Nikon Z7, however, features a 45MP sensor, while the Nikon Z6 uses a 25MP sensor, so the lower speed of the Nikon Z7 can be attributed to this feature.

With a higher MP sensor, the Nikon Z7 has the upper hand when it comes to image resolution, so it is great for capturing fine details. Due to the high resolution of the Nikon Z7 images, it’s the better choice for photographers who work with large prints or want more freedom when cropping.

Overall, the Nikon Z7 wins out for those who want to get the most detail out of the images, while the Nikon Z6 is the better choice for those who want the fastest continuous shooting speed.

Image Sample from the Nikon Z7:

Image sample from Nikon Z7

Image via PhotographyLife

Low Light Image Quality

Another big difference between these cameras is their performance in low light situations. The Nikon Z6 has a higher ISO limit, so it can capture higher quality images in lower light situations, plus it creates less noise than the detail-oriented Nikon Z7.

The Nikon Z6’s autofocus system detects better in low light situations as well, which gives this model another advantage for photographers who tend to shoot in darker conditions. For photographers who frequently plan on working in low light situations, the Nikon Z6 is the better choice.

Image Example from Nikon Z6:

Image sample from Nikon Z6

Image via DPReview

Autofocus Performance

The Nikon Z7 has an impressive autofocus system with 493 points that cover 90% of the field, and the Nikon Z6 features a system with 273 points. With so many points, the Nikon Z7 excels at locking in on its subjects and tracking them successfully while shooting.

The Nikon Z6 has autofocus advantages in low light situations, where it is able to focus at its usual speed in lower light, but the Nikon Z7 can utilize its low light autofocus feature to work in situations as low as -4EV at a slower operating pace.

The Nikon Z7 is the better choice for the sheer coverage of its autofocus system, but the Nikon Z6 wins out when it comes to low light situations at a faster focus speed.

Video Features & Quality

The Nikon Z7 and Nikon Z6 both have the ability to shoot 4K video or full HD up to 120p. Both of these cameras also offer the ability to extract still shots from video footage. Their designs feature microphone and headphone ports, which can contribute to higher quality sound with the use of external equipment.

With the utilization of silent autofocus, these models also benefit from being able to focus while shooting without interrupting the feed with noise. The Nikon Z6 has the advantage in video mode though, as it benefits from having fewer pixels and produces smoother video quality compared to the higher resolution Nikon Z7.

Final Thoughts

The Nikon Z7 and the Nikon Z6 are great introductions into what Nikon can do with full-frame technology, and these cameras appeal to professionals and semi-professionals who want well-developed cameras with professional-level features.

The Nikon Z7 is the pricier option of the two, but it features a 45MP sensor (which is almost double what the Nikon Z6 has), which makes it stand out in resolution and image quality, especially when it comes to retaining fine detail. This camera is the best fit for photographers who value detail over other features.

The Nikon Z6 is the cheaper option, and its significant advantages in low-light situations, video mode, and continuous shooting speed make it the best choice for photographers who want quick and reliable at a lower price.

Nikon D3500 vs D5600

Nikon D3500 vs. Nikon D5600

Nikon D3500 vs. Nikon D5600: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we break down the differences between the Nikon D3500 and the Nikon D5600, so you can decide which camera is the best fit for you.

The Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 are both entry-level DSLR cameras priced for photographers looking to get into the DSLR field at a low price point. When deciding on which camera would be best for your needs, it can be hard to discern which one has the best features, so we did the work for you!

Check out the key details and our in-depth comparison to see which of these beginner cameras would be the best fit.

Key Details at a Glance:

Here are the side-by-side specs of the Nikon D3500 and the Nikon D5600:

Nikon D3500 Nikon D5600
Price New: $396.95, Used: ~$300 (Body Only) New: $596.95, Used: ~$520 (Body Only)
Release Date 8/29/2018 11/10/2016
Sensor 24MP APS-C CMOS 24MP APS-C CMOS
Viewfinder Optical Optical
Articulating LCD Screen No Yes
LCD Screen Size 3 3.2
Viewfinder Resolution 2359k 2359k
Lens Type Nikon F Mount Nikon F Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 5.0 fps 5.0 fps
Video Resolution 1920×1080 1920×1080
Weather sealed No No
Image Stabilization No No
Color Depth Not Tested 24.1
Dynamic Range Not Tested 14.0
Low Light ISO Not Tested 1306
Battery Life 1550 820
Time Lapse Recording No Yes
Touchscreen No Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No Yes
Wireless Connection No Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes Yes
Microphone Port No Yes
AE Bracketing No Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash Yes Yes
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 305 305
Dimensions 124x97x70mm 124x97x70mm
Weight 365g 465g

In-Depth Comparison

Both the Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 are entry-level DSLR cameras, but at different price points and release dates, there are advantages and disadvantages for each model.

Looking at the specs can help provide a better idea of which may be the best choice, but an in-depth comparison explains how these features function within the camera’s usage. The main differences between the Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 can be found in their design, battery life, video features, and connectivity features.

Design

The Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 have similar physical designs, as both of them are compact DSLR bodies. Both cameras have the same dimensions, 124x97x70mm, but the Nikon D3500 is 100g lighter, only weighing 365g. While the body designs are nearly identical, the Nikon D3500 holds an advantage in weight.

The Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 are both equipped with LCD screens, and the Nikon D3500’s screen is 3’’ while the Nikon D5600 is 3.2’’. Along with a slightly bigger size, the Nikon D5600 has a fully articulating LCD screen, which allows it to be used from many different angles and can come in handy when used for selfies or vlogging.

Nikon D5600 fully articulating LCD screen

Image via Ken Rockwell

Neither the Nikon D3500 or the Nikon D5600 is weather-sealed, so they aren’t equipped for harsh weather conditions. Both cameras incorporate a hot shoe feature, allowing for external flash options, as well as built-in flash features.

Overall, the designs are similar, but the Nikon D5600 has significant advantages with its fully articulating LCD screen, especially for photographers who rely on being able to see the screen from different angles.

Battery Life

Both the Nikon D3500 and the Nikon D5600 have pretty impressive battery lives, and can last over 500 shots, but the Nikon D3500 has the upper hand when it comes to battery life. The Nikon D3500 can last for 1,550 shots, while the Nikon D5600 can last for 820.

With a 730 shot advantage, the Nikon D3500 is the better choice for photographers who are looking for a long lasting battery.

Image Quality & Performance

As far as beginner-level DSLR cameras go, the Nikon D3500 and the Nikon D5600 perform well against their competitors, yet each brings their own advantages to the entry-level field.

Image Example from the Nikon D5600:

Image of a boat on the beach

Image via Digital Camera World

The Nikon D3500 features 11 autofocus points, clustered in the middle of the field, which works well if your subject is not at the edge of your frame. The Nikon D5600 ups the number of points to 39 autofocus points, giving it an advantage over the Nikon D3500.

Image Example from the D3500:

Image of a fire hydrant

Image via DPReview

Both cameras forgo the Anti-Aliasing filter, which gives the cameras the ability to collect finer detail in their images, with the risk of added moire in some light settings. Getting the hang of a camera with no AA filter can be an adjustment, but it does add the ability for higher image quality.

Connectivity & Image Transfer

The Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 both have built-in Bluetooth connections, which allows for instant image transfer between devices. However, the Nikon D5600 takes it a step further and includes WiFi connection to speed up and make image transfer even easier.

Neither the Nikon D3500 or the Nikon D5600 have a GPS feature. Both cameras do have the ability to be controlled remotely through a smartphone, which makes it easy to get creative while shooting.

Video

Both cameras have 1920×1080 video resolution at 60fps, so the Nikon D3500 and Nikon D5600 can shoot basic video, but are not made to be video cameras. With significant design advantages, however, the Nikon D5600 is the better choice for users planning to rely on the video function.

Nikon D3500 back screen

Image via DPReview

The Nikon D5600 has an external microphone port, unlike the Nikon D3500 which only has an internal mic, and this allows for the option to have better sound quality. The Nikon D5600 also has a fully articulating LCD screen, which can be manipulated easily for video footage, including flipped for selfies and vlog-style videos.

Final Thoughts

Both the Nikon D3500 and the Nikon D5600 are entry-level DSLR cameras that fit a lower budget, which makes them solid options for anyone wanting to get into the DSLR world. By choosing one of these cameras, any photographer would be able to get into the DSLR without shelling out too much at first.

The Nikon D3500 comes at a significantly lower price point, so if price is a deciding factor, this camera is probably the best choice. Along with the price, the Nikon D3500 has a longer battery life and weighs less, so it’s a good choice for photographers planning on doing long shoots.

The Nikon D5600 has the upper hand in several categories, including the autofocus system, LCD screen design, WiFi connection, and video features. With a fully articulating LCD screen, the Nikon D5600 works better for photographers and videographers wanting to easily shoot at different angles.

Overall, the Nikon D3500 is a great option for those with a lower budget, but the Nikon D5600 outshines in features for those willing to go up a bit in price.

Sony a7iii vs. Sony a7riii

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III: The Complete Comparison

In this article, we break down the key differences between the Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III, as well as provide a detailed analysis of their best features, so you can decide which is the best fit for you.

The Sony a7 III and Sony a7r III are mirrorless full-frame cameras released about a year apart. Both of these cameras have similar designs and features at different price points, so deciding between the two can be a bit tricky.

We broke down the basics for you, and give a detailed comparison of the defining features between the two to make your decision process easier. Check out the following:

Key Details at a Glance:

Here are the side-by-side specs of the Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III:

Sony a7 III Sony a7r III
Price New: $1,998.00, Used: $1,700 $2,498.00, Used: ~$2,000
Release Date 2/27/2018 10/25/2017
Sensor 24MP Full-Frame BSI-CMOS 42MP Full-Frame BSI-CMOS
Viewfinder EVF EVF
Articulating LCD Screen Yes Yes
LCD Screen Size 3 3
Viewfinder Resolution 2359k 3686k
Lens Type Sony E Mount Sony E Mount
Continuous Shooting Speed 10.0 fps 10.0 fps
Video Resolution 3840×2160 3840×2160
High-Speed Video 120 fps 120 fps
Weather sealed Yes Yes
Image Stabilization Sensor-Shift Sensor-Shift
Color Depth 25.0 26.0
Dynamic Range 14.7 14.7
Low Light ISO 3730 3523
Battery Life 610 Shots 650 Shots
Time-Lapse Recording Yes Yes
Touchscreen Yes Yes
Selfie Friendly LCD No No
Wireless Connection Yes Yes
Bluetooth Connection Yes Yes
Microphone Port Yes Yes
AE Bracketing Yes Yes
Smartphone Remote Yes Yes
Built-in Flash No No
External Flash Yes Yes
Lenses Available 116 (72 Full Frame) 116 (72 Full Frame)
Dimensions 127x96x74mm 127x96x74mm
Weight 650g 657g

In-Depth Comparison:

Looking at key specs can give you an idea of what camera may better fit your needs, but here we provide a detailed explanation to help you understand how these features affect the functionality of each camera.

Design

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Side by Side

Image via Techradar

As far as mirrorless full-frame cameras go, the Sony a7 III and Sony a7r III both have very similar, compact designs. Their dimensions are the same at 127x96x74mm, and the Sony a7r III is slightly heavier at 657g compared to the 650g of the Sony a7 III.

These cameras feature a small grip and the same button layout, which features smaller buttons than past generations. The Sony a7r III has one small difference in layout, as it features an additional socket for the flash sync.

Both of these cameras have articulating LCD screens, which allows for flexibility when shooting at different angles. The Sony a7r III’s LCD screen offers a higher resolution, making the quality live view sharper and smoother.

The Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III both feature Electronic View Finders (EVF), but there is a slight difference between the EVF in each camera. The Sony a7r III utilizes a more advanced EVF with high resolution and the ability for High-Speed 120fps, which contributes to a smoother live view and sharper view.

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Ports

Image via DPReview

Neither of these cameras incorporate a built-in flash, but they do have the option for external flash mounts. The Sony a7r III has a socket for external flash sync, whereas the Sony a7 III does not.

Image Quality

The Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III deliver great image results, and have similar image results for standard shoots. The main difference between the cameras lies within the sensor of the Sony a7r III, which has a 42MP sensor resolution. The Sony a7 III only has a 24MP, so the image quality of the Sony a7r III is sharper.

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Image Quality

Image via Mirrorless Comparison

The Sony a7r III also features no AA filter, which allows you to take pictures without auto-blurring of details. Between the sensor advantage and lack of AA filter, the Sony a7r III delivers sharper images, especially in still shots like commercial and portrait photography.

This isn’t to say that the Sony a7 III can’t hold up with its 24MP, but if sharper image quality is an important feature for your needs, the Sony a7r III is the winner.

Low Light Images

Another main difference between the Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III is the ISO range and low light capability of the cameras.

The Sony a7 III features an ISO range of 100-51200, which can be expanded to 50-204800. The Sony a7r III has a smaller ISO range at 100-32000, which only expands to 100-102400.

With this advantage in ISO range, the Sony a7 III performs better in low light situations, with less noise in its shots. The differences in these cameras can be seen in the following examples, which highlight the noise in the Sony a7r III’s low light images and the strong performance of the Sony a7 III:

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Image Noise

Image via Mirrorless Comparison

Autofocus

The autofocus technology on these cameras works well on each model, but there are slight differences between the two. The Sony a7 III features 693 detection points, which covers 93% of the image field, and the Sony a7r III features 399 detection points, or 68% of the image area.

Example showing the expansive coverage of the Sony a7 III’s autofocus technology:

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Focus Points

Image via DPReview

The Sony a7 III has the advantage when it comes to autofocus, and it’s a great system if you do a lot of action or sports photography.

Continuous Shooting

Another area where the Sony a7 III excels is, surprisingly, the continuous shooting. The Sony a7 III has a lower resolution, which gives the camera an advantage when it comes to buffering and continuous shooting.

Image example from the Sony a7 III:

Sony a7 III vs. a7r III - Image Sample

Image via Fstoppers

The Sony a7 III has a larger buffer capacity, which allows for more burst images, and gives this camera an edge if you work heavily in action photography.

Video

Both of these cameras have 3840×2160 video resolution with the high-speed option of 120fps. The Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III both have microphone and headphone ports, which allow for external mics that produce better sound quality.

The autofocus technology of the Sony a7 III comes into play, allowing for smooth autofocus throughout the video, but it can be a bit unpredictable when there are multiple subjects in the shot.

Overall, the Sony a7 III and Sony a7r III deliver solid video results without much difference between the models.

Final Thoughts

The Sony a7 III and the Sony a7r III have very little difference in physical design, and the weight differences won’t matter once you’ve added lenses and any other accessories. The LCD and EVF design of the Sony a7r III provides a sharper, smoother view when using.

If you are a commercial or portrait photographer, the sharper image quality of the Sony a7r III will be a huge selling point, whereas the continuous shooting ability due to the Sony a7 III’s lower resolution may appeal more to action and sports photographers.

The autofocus and the low light ability of the Sony a7 III make it a great option for those who know they’ll be shooting in low light or action scenarios.

Overall, each camera is a great option for a mirrorless full-frame camera. If you plan on working with low light shoots and action photography, the Sony a7 III may fit your needs better. The Sony a7r III has a better sensor and provides sharper images.